• ‘Serial killer' admits to killing three Seattle-area men in jihad-inspired crime spree

    By: Casey McNerthney , The Associated Press

    Updated:

    UPDATE, March 6, 2018: Ali Muhammad Brown admitted Tuesday to killing two men in Seattle and another man in Skyway during a jihad-inspired crime spree, a case investigator said. 

    Brown abruptly pleaded guilty during jury selection in New Jersey, where he was on trial for killing a man there, NJ.com reported.

    Authorities in Seattle said that Brown described himself to detectives as a strict Muslim who was angry with the U.S. government's role in Iraq, Iran and Afghanistan because of the death of innocent civilians and children.

    “This is one of these cases where the victim could have been anyone; they were killed at random,” said Cloyd Steiger, who investigated the case as a Seattle police homicide detective and is now Chief Investigator at the Washington State Attorney General's Homicide Incident Tracking System. 

    Brown admitted killing Ahmed Said, 27, and Dwone Anderson-Young, 23, shortly after midnight June 1, 2014, near 29th Avenue South and South King Street, police said.

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    Related: Police say gay men may have met random killer through social app

    On Tuesday, Brown also admitted killing Leroy Henderson in Skyway. That killing happened April 27, 2014. Authorities said Brown fled to New Jersey days after shooting the Seattle men. 

    Steiger said Brown talked about the jihad-inspired crime spree during interviews. 

    “He is a serial killer,” said Steiger, who also profiled the case in a book about his time with Seattle police

    Related: Read additional details about Brown's initial arrest here.

    ORIGINAL TEXT, Jan 20, 2016: A Seattle man – charged with a terrorism count for allegedly killing a New Jersey college student because he was angry about U.S. foreign policy – was sentenced Wednesday in an unrelated armed robbery case after refusing to take part in a court hearing.


    Quick facts:

    • Ali Muhammad Brown received a 36 1/2-year sentence for robbery.
    • In addition to terrorism-murder case in N.J., he faces also charges for Seattle double homicide in 2014.
    • A nationwide manhunt was underway for Brown in July 2014; he was arrested in New Jersey.
    • Brown has described himself to detectives as a strict Muslim who was angry with the U.S. government's role in Iraq.

    Ali Muhammad Brown has been accused of killing four people in two states in a fit of rage over the U.S. government's role in the Middle East. He wore ear plugs during Wednesday's hearing and was flanked by 10 sheriff's office deputies.

    Brown, who has refused to leave his jail cell, was convicted of robbery in an unrelated case in New Jersey last year. He received a 36 1/2-year sentence in that case on Wednesday.

    His lawyer, Albert Kapin, told a state judge that he still wants to get some more evidence and plans to file some motions in the terrorism case. But Kapin would not say if he would seek to have the charges dismissed.

    Brendan Tevlin, a 19-year-old University of Richmond student, was shot at a West Orange traffic light on June 25, 2014, as he drove to his home to Livingston.

    Brown also faces three aggravated murder charges in Washington: the April 27, 2014, shooting of 30-year-old Leroy Henderson in Skyway, south of Seattle, and the June 1, 2014, shooting deaths of two young men outside a Seattle gay nightclub, Ahmed Said and Dwone Anderson-Young.

    Authorities in Seattle have said that Brown described himself to detectives as a strict Muslim who was angry with the U.S. government's role in Iraq, Iran and Afghanistan because of the death of innocent civilians and children.

    The case is the first filed under a New Jersey anti-terrorism statute passed following the Sept. 11 attacks.

    Other states have similar laws, though they have rarely been used. Some state charges, such as ones filed against gang members in New York, have failed to survive the courts. More recently, though, New York state successfully prosecuted two cases under its terrorism law against men who had planned bomb attacks.

    Copyright The Associated Press

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