Lawmaker wants to make Sasquatch one of Washington's state symbols

A Washington senator wants Sasquatch to become a symbol in the Evergreen state.

Sen. Ann Rivers (R-La Center) was partially inspired to propose a bill that would designate Sasquatch as the state cryptid -- an animal not proven to exist -- after receiving a letter from a young constituent last year, when she first introduced the bill.

Rivers says refiling the legislation isn't just an eccentric gesture to get Bigfoot labeled as one of our nearly two dozen state symbols. It's a way to create revenue for state park maintenance and improvements, she says.

Here's what else lawmakers have filed this legislative session:

If the two bills pass, Sasquatch license plates would be created, and sales of the special plates would raise money. The specialty plates would cost $40 with a $30 annual renewal fee.

“I’m guessing Sasquatch has a hidden talent as a fundraiser,” said Rivers. “And assuming that Sasquatch is a native Washingtonian, and our state parks are part of Sasquatch’s native habitat, it makes perfect sense to capitalize on Sasquatch’s popularity in a way that would help protect and improve that habitat.”

“The strong positive reaction to my bill to make Sasquatch the state cryptid proved that people of all ages are still taken by the idea that such a creature is out there. I have no doubt that some of them will like the idea of a Sasquatch license plate, and appreciate that buying one is good for the park system,” she said.

It's no secret that there are true believers in the mythical beast. The Daily Herald talked to a group of Sasquatch hunters in 2014 who believed Bigfoot could be lurking in Snohomish County.

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