San Francisco ordinance to charge ‘Karens’ for racially-motivated 911 calls

San Francisco ordinance to charge ‘Karens’ for racially-motivated 911 calls

SAN FRANCISCO — A San Francisco official has introduced an ordinance called the Caution Against Racially Exploitative Non-Emergencies (CAREN) Act which could result in criminal charges for people who call law enforcement based on racial bias.

The act, which was introduced by San Francisco Board of Supervisors Shamann Walton, is intentionally similar to the pejorative name “Karen.”

Content Continues Below

While it is already a crime in San Francisco to make a false report, the bill would make it unlawful to fabricate a report based on someone’s race, gender, sexual orientation, ethnicity or religious affiliation, according to Forbes.

The ordinance is similar to a California bill introduced last month by assembly member Rob Bonta, to help end discriminatory 911 calls in the state:

The intent of AB 1550 is not to discourage individuals who are facing real danger or who seek to report a crime in good faith from calling 911. Instead, this bill could protect millions of Californians from becoming targets of hate and prevent the weaponization of our law enforcement against communities of color.
Assembly member Rob Bonta (D-Oakland) - District 18

Walton said during the Board of Supervisors meeting that “both measures are part of a larger nationwide movement to address racial biases and implement consequences for weaponizing emergency resources with racist intentions,” according to KNTV.

“Karen” has become synonymous with typically a white woman who is perceived to be entitled or racist and responds by demanding to speak to a manager or calling police.