Joe Biden visits Seattle for 2 fundraising events

Protesters are in Seattle's Queen Anne neighborhood -- to oppose Joe Biden and his involvement with Amazon. The presidential candidate came to Seattle yesterday for a pair of private fundraisers.

Former Vice President Joe Biden spoke at two fundraising events Friday in Seattle.

One was held at the home of Janet Ketcham in the Madison Park neighborhood.

Biden spoke to 105 donors and began his address referencing the latest school shooting in 
Santa Clarita, California. He said the continued succession of shootings represents "a moral failure on our country's part."

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Biden referred to the Second Amendment, saying he supports it, but he also said called the absolutist arguments by some gun rights supporters "bizarre."

Biden said, "Why should we allow people to have military-style weapons including pistols with 9-millimeter bullets that can hold 10 rounds?"

Much of Biden's speech was about his experience as it relates to serving in the White House. He said he needed no on-the-job training.

Biden spoke for more than a half hour and then went to the Queen Anne neighborhood for his second fundraiser, held at the home of Amazon general counsel David Zapolsky.

In Zapolsky's introduction of Biden, he said all political backgrounds are looking "for people we trust as public servants who can bring stability to our government -- and you can certainly do that."

Biden talked to people gathered in Zapolsky's living room. He even recognized some local elected officials who were in the room.

Biden also talked about how the middle class has lost confidence and how Democrats have lost touch with part of the working class. He mentioned the revolution of technology and how some of the pessimistic feelings have come because of it, which Amazon has played a part in.

"I'm in the House of Amazon here," Biden said, drawing chuckles. "Seriously, think of the change that is taking place and why people are frightened. Nothing bad -- you've done good things. But 200,000 salespeople are out of work because people are shopping online now."

He also critiqued some of his political party primary opponents, but he didn't name names.

The donors paid $2,800 each to attend the event.

On Saturday, he is expected to visit Portland for more fundraisers.