• Here's how the Washington State Democrats' caucus works

    Updated:

    More than 90,000 people preregistered to attend the Washington Democratic caucus this weekend, according to a spokesman for Washington State Democrats.

    A total of 101 delegates are at stake on Saturday. Hillary Clinton has a lead of more than 300 delegates over Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders in the race for the Democratic presidential nomination. It takes 2,383 delegates to win the Democratic nomination.

    Why is there a caucus?

    Washington State Democrats do not use the state-run primary to choose its presidential nominee. Instead, Democrats who want to have a part in choosing the next president attend precinct caucuses, which will begin at 10 a.m. Saturday.

    What is a precinct caucus?

    Precinct caucuses are local meetings of people in the same political party. They discuss their opinions on the presidential race, then vote for a presidential nominee.

    How long will it take?

    The meeting should take no longer than 2 hours, and some locations may take less time than that.

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    The Washington State Democrats’ process for selecting delegates has four steps. Saturday is just step one.

    Step one: Precinct caucuses will be held Saturday. The Washington Democrats will be choosing 27,162 delegates for its county and legislative district caucuses, where 1,400 people will be chosen to move on to its congressional district caucuses.

    Step two: Legislative district caucuses – which will elect delegates and alternates to the congressional district caucuses and state convention – are April 17. The county conventions, which address resolutions and might adopt a platform, are held May 1.

    Step 3: The congressional district caucuses, which elect 67 delegates to the National Convention, are May 21.

    • The state convention is June 17-19. Delegates and alternates elected at the legislative district caucuses also serve as delegates and alternates to the state convention. The state convention will elect presidential electors, adopt a state party platform and address resolutions.
    • In addition, those members of the Washington State Democratic Central Committee who represent legislative districts will meet on June 19 to elect 12 pledged party leaders and elected official delegates, 22 delegates and seven alternates to the national convention.

    Step four: National convention: Delegates and alternates elected at the congressional district caucuses and the state convention will attend the 2016 national convention, which will be held July 25-28 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

    For more quick links, go to the Washington State Democrats' caucus website.

    To learn how Washington State Republicans choose delegates to their national convention, click here.

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