Woman in Green Lake shooting said victim was involved in ‘game of manipulation'

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SEATTLE - A woman accused of shooting a coworker in the chest and threatening another with a handgun told police she believed the two were involved in a “game of manipulation” in which she could never win. 

Police said Seattle Parks and Recreation employee Carolyn “Zoom” Piksa shot work acquaintance William Keller in the chest at her workplace in the Green Lake neighborhood Friday and then went to the Bitter Lake Community Center and aimed a gun at friend and coworker Cynthia Etelamaki. 

Piksa was charged with first- and second-degree assault in the incidents. 

According to charging documents, after Piksa was arrested at her home in Burien following the attacks, she told detectives she went to confront Keller and Etelamaki about their “manipulation” Friday because she was finding it more difficult to do her everyday tasks.

Detectives said Piksa told them she believed it was time to “put my cards on the table.” 

During an interview with police, Piksa said she believed that Keller and Etelamaki conspired to have contacts removed from her cellphone, money removed from her bank account and caused noises at night which prevented her from sleeping, court documents said. 

Piksa said she wanted to question Keller and Etelamaki about the activities and “find out how to get out of the game,” court papers said. 

Piksa said when she went into Keller’s office armed with a .357 Magnum handgun to talk to him, “I knew he wasn’t saying what should have been said,” charging papers said. 

According to Piksa, when she pulled out the gun and pointed it at Keller’s head, Keller then pointed at his own chest and told her to shoot him, police wrote in court documents.

Court documents said Piksa then fired a shot into his chest, left his office, retrieved her lunch out of a refrigerator near her working area, and left to go to the Bitter Lake Community Center.

Piksa was later arrested at her Burien home. 

When Keller was able to speak with police, he told officers Piksa demanded to speak with him and then asked him what he had to say.  Keller said that Piksa, who was standing about 5 feet away, pulled out a gun and pointed it at his head. 

Keller said he put his hands in front of his face and pleaded for her not to shoot him in the head.  She then lowered the gun, opened and closed the cylinder as if she was checking the ammunition, then abruptly raised the gun and shot him in the chest.

In charging documents, Piksa described Keller as a work acquaintance, but not someone she worked for directly.  She told detectives she considered Etelamaki a friend.

Piksa’s bail was set at $1 million.