State senator Ed Murray's lead widens in race for Seattle mayor

by: Essex Porter Updated:


SEATTLE, Wash. - Effectiveness and economic justice will be central issues in the Seattle's mayor'srace, now that voters have chosen incumbent Mayor Mike McGinn and state Sen. Ed Murray to go on to the general election in November.

Murray will tell voters that he will be more effective. "I think the issue is about not just simply what we do about homelessness," Murray said, "but actually doing something about homelessness. It's not about that we want to reform the police department, but actually doing something to reform our police department."

McGinn rejects the characterization of him as unable to work well with other leaders. "Look at our record," McGinn said. 

"We're getting things done. We didn't do that all alone. We did that with the help of a lot of people. We did that with the help of the city council members, we did that with the voters, expanding library hours, expanding education funding, sound transit's doing planning with us, we've got a leadership alliance with coal trains."

McGinn will continue to take a stand against a non-union Whole Foods store in West Seattle, saying he's better at looking out for the interest of the working class. "I'm pro-business; I'm just not pro-business as usual. I think we need to widen the circle of prosperity and let more people get included."

Murray will remind voters of his record, seeking social justice. "I have an 18-year record of being one of the most progressive legislators in Olympia, passing some of the most important social justice legislation of the last decade, of the last two decades, so I think you can hardly say that I'm the establishment candidate."