San Francisco plane crash causes delays at Sea-Tac

by: Alison Grande Updated:

SEATTLE —

The crash in San Francisco meant cancellations and delays at Sea-Tac Airport on Saturday.

Travelers who hoped to get to San Francisco had to wait. Many flights were canceled Saturday afternoon, others delayed.

"There was a crash so we knew something was coming our way," said Susan Perotto. "So the flight was going to be delayed, maybe eight hours. Now cancelled for three days."

But waiting wasn't an option for Perotto. Her flight was rescheduled for Tuesday; she has to be at work in San Francisco on Monday.

 "We're renting a car, which we've already done, and we're driving 14 hours. Her daughter was less than pleased with the plan, "It's not very nice. A two-hour flight compared to a 14-hour drive," said Kelsea Magaline, who also has to be at work Monday.

Virginia DeMetrios wasn't satisfied waiting. She bought new tickets for her family to fly to Oakland instead. "A whole new flight, twice the cost of coming up here, " said DeMetrios, "It was $1,200 to here round trip and we had to spend $1,200 one way, to get back."

Getting to Seattle was equally challenging for travelers stranded in San Francisco.
The Miletic family flew from Miami to San Francisco. Their flight landed right after Asiana Flight 214. "Just as we were landing there was this huge cloud of black smoke coming from the side of the runway, " said Ben Miletic. To finally get to Sea-Tac they had to take a bus to the San Jose Airport and then a flight to Sea-Tac. It was a very long day for the family traveling with two children, two and under. Jennifer Miletic was rattled by what she witnessed in San Francisco, "It was frightening. First thing we thought was of the people on board, cause it didn't look good at all."

Some passengers on that San Jose flight arrived at Sea-Tac, their luggage did not. Mary Meeks was standing in line, waiting to talk to the airline. She seemed to have it all in perspective and was more concerned about the victims on the Asiana flight, "We need to show a little compassion and pray for them," said Meeks.