Police chief didn't know her assistant is a 'Brady Cop'

by: David Ham Updated:


BONNEY LAKE, Wash. - Chief Dana Powers said she didn't know and doesn't believe that her Assistant Chief, James Keller, is on what's called a "Brady List."

The Brady List is compiled by prosecutors of law enforcement officers that have been convicted of a crime or have been dishonest or untruthful on the job.

It could impact whether or not the officer's testimony will hold up in a court of law.

Before Keller was hired by Bonney Lake Police in 2007, he was a deputy for King County.

In 2004, an internal investigation from then Sheriff David Reichert wrote to Keller that he tried "to scare the informant and further punish him by leading him to believe he may be thrown in the river."

He added there were "many troubling discrepancies in your statements."

Reichert told Keller, "I cannot say that I fully believe your accounts of that evening."

Keller was on trial on assault charges in that incident but was acquitted.

After he left the King County Sheriff's Office for Bonney Lake Police, he was promoted to sergeant and then to assistant chief in February.

Powers said over the phone that she did a background check on Keller and he was never on a Brady list.

Bonney Lake Mayor Neil Johnson also told us over the phone that Keller did go through an extensive background check and he was never aware of Keller being on the list.

KIRO 7 obtained the Brady list from the King County Prosecutors office.

There are also numerous published reports online that say Keller is on the Brady list.

Pierce County Prosecutor Mark Lindquist said that his office does not have a Brady list but that it is up to police departments to let prosecutors know about anything that would impact a case such as being on a Brady list.

Current King County Sheriff John Urquhart wouldn't talk about Keller's case specifically, but did talk about what it means to be a "Brady cop."

"It may not affect the testimony at all it's up to the defense to bring it up to the judge and a judge then will decide whether that information is going to be disclosed to the jury or not," said Urquhart. "Clearly police officers are held to a higher standard there's no question of that and when they fall below that standard for whatever reason the defense has a right to know that."

Lindquist said his prosecutors may have to go back and review cases where Keller took the stand.

Keller is paid $109,620 a year by the City of Bonney Lake.