Movie about dangers of football details effects on brain


SEATTLE - It's a film the NFL does not want you to see --a documentary put together by a local man detailing the effects playing football has on the brain.

The United States of Football will screen at the Triple Door in Seattle Friday night.

Filmmaker Sean Pamphilon said it was tough to make the film because of his love for football.  But he said it had to be done because the NFL is masking the game’s danger because of its immense popularity.

Before Pamphilon let his son play football, he wanted to educate the 12-year-old.

“You can have concussion training for coaches.  That’s great.  You can have minimized hitting. That’s great. (But) it’s repetitive head trauma for some people every single play,” said Pamphilion.

Former players, television analysts and doctors discuss the possible long-term damage of repeated football concussions.

“All the hits to the head, the brown spots you see when you get up off the ground – I wish people would have told me about that,” said former NFL player Leonard Marshal.

Pamphilon and his wife have attempted to do just that.

Everyone should be suspicious of a situation where someone is going, ‘No, no, we’re researching it … it’s fine, continue – we’re researching it,’” said executive producer Tenny Priebe. 

They want parents to know that kids, whose brains are still developing, are especially susceptible.

They use the new Heads Up Football campaign as an example of how the league is avoiding the issue.

“What you’re seeing is so ridiculous that every coach I’ve talked to says you don’t see football like that,” said Sean Pamphilon.

Pamphilon was also at the center of the New Orleans Saints “Bountygate” scandal.  His cameras caught coach Gregg Williams encouraging his players to injure opponents. While he said that culture won’t ever be tolerated in an NFL locker room again, the damage can still be done. 

“I don’t want Russell Wilson to play 20 years of NFL football.  It’s pretty awesome he won a Super Bowl.  I want him to remember it when he’s 44,” said Pamphilon.

Friday night Pamphilon and former Seahawks John Moffitt and Sam Adams will discuss the issues after the movie.

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