Aaron Ybarra convicted of murder, all charges in SPU shootings

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Aaron Ybarra, the man accused of shooting three people, one fatally, at Seattle Pacific University in 2014, has been found guilty of first-degree murder and other charges.

>>RELATED: Compromise of Jurors’ IDs Could Have Resulted In Mistrial

Ybarra was also charged with three counts of first-degree attempted murder, and one count of second-degree assault.  He was found guilty of all charges late Wednesday morning.


>>Amy Clancy was in the courtroom every day during the trial. Read all of her blogs here


Ybarra shot and killed 19-year-old Paul Lee at the university in June 2014. He also shot two other students who survived.

Ybarra pleaded not guilty by reason of insanity.  The jury found that he was not insane at the time of the crimes.

During the trial, Ybarra's mother, Janice, testified that Aaron had developmental problems while he was growing up.

Janice Ybarra said in court that Aaron was familiar with weapons and had worked at the Kenmore Gun Range for years.

When Aaron Ybarra took the stand, he said he didn't know what he'd done was real "until I was sitting in the backseat of the police car." 

>>RELATED: Accused SPU shooter takes stand

His brother, Joel Ybarra, testified that Aaron heard the voice of Columbine shooter Eric Harris tell him  to "shoot up the University of Washington." 

But during cross-examination, the prosecution asked Joel Ybarra:

 “He didn’t talk about not having control over his actions?”

Joel Ybarra: “Not at all.” 

Deldene Garner, Aaron Ybarra's chemical dependency professional, testified that Aaron Ybarra "talked about hearing voices. He mentioned specifically Eric Harris, he mentioned specifically Columbine.” 

>>RELATED: Jurors visit scene of SPU shootings

Prosecutors argued that Aaron Ybarra had planned the killings ahead of the shootings in June of 2014 because three days before the shooting, Ybarra wrote in a journal "I know I will kill quite a few women." 

"(Ybarra wrote in his journal), "'I just want people to die.' That's pre-meditation," Deputy Assistant Prosecutor Kristin Richardson said during closing arguments.

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