President Trump fires acting Attorney General for refusing to defend immigration order

by: Julie Pace and Eric Tucker, The Associated Press Updated:

WASHINGTON, DC - JUNE 28: Deputy Attorney General Sally Q. Yates speaks during a press conference at the Department of Justice on June 28, 2016 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Pete Marovich/Getty Images)
UPDATE 6:16 p.m.: President Donald Trump named Dana Boente, US Attorney for the Eastern District of Virginia, as Acting Attorney General. Sally Yates was relieved.
 
Here is additional information on Boente from the Department of Justice:
Dana J. Boente was nominated by President Barack Obama on Oct. 8, 2015, and confirmed by the United States Senate on Dec. 15, 2015, as the 60th U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of Virginia (EDVA). As the chief federal law enforcement for the district, which includes offices in Alexandria, Richmond, Norfolk and Newport News, Boente supervises the prosecution of federal crimes and the litigation of federal civil matters.
Boente is a 31-year veteran of the Department of Justice, and has spent his professional career in public service. He began as a law clerk to Chief U.S. District Judge J. Waldo Ackerman for the Central District of Illinois in 1982. In 1984, he joined the Tax Division’s Criminal Section as part of the Attorney General’s Honors Program.  In January 2001, Boente became an Assistant U.S. Attorney in the Fraud Unit of EDVA. He was detailed to the Tax Division in August 2005 to serve as the Principal Deputy Assistant Attorney General.  Boente returned to EDVA when he was selected as the First Assistant U.S. Attorney in May 2007, and later served as the U.S. Attorney for EDVA from October 2008 through September 2009.  In December 2012, Boente was appointed by Attorney General Eric Holder to serve as the U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of Louisiana, a position he held until September 2013. He became the Acting U.S. Attorney for EDVA by virtue of the Vacancy Reform Act on Sept. 23, 2013, and served in that position until Dec. 15, 2015.
Boente is a graduate of St. Louis University (B.S.B.A. and M.B.A.) and its School of Law (J.D.). He has lived in Northern Virginia for 29 years.
ORIGINAL TEXT: Acting Attorney General Sally Yates, a Democratic appointee, on Monday directed Justice Department attorneys not to defend President Donald Trump's controversial executive refugee and immigration ban, joining a growing group of administration officials distancing themselves from the new president's order.
 
Her directive was likely to be temporary, given that Sen. Jeff Sessions, Trump's pick for attorney general, will likely move to uphold the president's policy. Sessions is awaiting Senate confirmation.
 
Still, it set up a dramatic standoff between a president and his own Justice Department just days into his tenure.
 
"I am responsible for ensuring that the positions we take in court remain consistent with this institution's solemn obligation to always seek justice and stand for what is right," Yates wrote in a letter announcing her position. "At present, I am not convinced that the defense of the Executive Order is consistent with these responsibilities nor am I convinced that the Executive Order is lawful."
 
Trump responded Monday by accusing Democrats of delaying approval of his Cabinet nominees for political reasons. "Now have an Obama A.G.," the president wrote on Twitter.
 
The Senate Judiciary Committee is expected to approve Sessions' nomination Tuesday and he could be approved by the full Senate soon after.
 
Yates' abrupt decision deepened the discord and dissent surrounding Trump's order, which temporarily halted the entire U.S. refugee program and banned all entries from seven Muslim-majority nations for 90 days. As protests erupted at airports over the weekend and confusion disrupted travel around the globe, some of Trump's top advisers and fellow Republicans privately noted they were not consulted about the policy.
 
At least three top national security officials — Defense Secretary Jim Mattis, Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly and Rex Tillerson, who is awaiting confirmation to lead the State Department — have told associates they were not aware of details of directive until around the time Trump signed it. Leading intelligence officials were also left largely in the dark, according to U.S. officials.
 
Tennessee Sen. Bob Corker, the top Republican on the Senate Foreign Relations committee, said that despite White House assurances that congressional leaders were consulted, he learned about the order in the media.
 
Other parts of Trump's administration were voicing dissent Monday. A large group of American diplomats circulated a memo voicing their opposition to the order, which temporarily halted the entire U.S. refugee program and banned all entries from seven Muslim-majority nations for 90 days. In a startlingly combative response, White House spokesman Sean Spicer challenged those opposed to the measure to resign.
 
"They should either get with the program or they can go," Spicer said.
 
The blowback underscored Trump's tenuous relationship with his own national security advisers, many of whom he met for the first time during the transition, as well as with the government bureaucracy he now leads. While Trump outlined his plan for temporarily halting entry to the U.S. from countries with terror ties during the campaign, the confusing way in which it finally was crafted stunned some who have joined his team.
 
Mattis, who stood next to Trump during Friday's signing ceremony, is said to be particularly incensed. A senior U.S. official said Mattis, along with Joint Chiefs Chairman Joseph Dunford, was aware of the general concept of Trump's order but not the details. Tillerson has told the president's political advisers that he was baffled over not being consulted on the substance of the order.
 
U.S. officials and others with knowledge of the Cabinet's thinking insisted on anonymity in order to disclose the officials' private views.
 
Trump's order pauses America's entire refugee program for four months and indefinitely bans all those from war-ravaged Syria. Federal judges in New York and several other states issued orders that temporarily block the government from deporting people with valid visas who arrived after Trump's travel ban took effect.
 
The president has privately acknowledged flaws in the rollout, according to a person with knowledge of his thinking. But he's also blamed the media — his frequent target — for what he believes are reports exaggerating the dissent and the number of people actually affected.
 
Trump has also said he believes the voters who carried him to victory support the plan as a necessary step to safeguard the nation. And he's dismissed objectors as attention-seeking rabble-rousers and grandstanding politicians.
 
After a chaotic weekend during which some U.S. legal permanent residents were detained at airports, some agencies were moving swiftly to try to clean up after the White House.
 
Homeland Security, the agency tasked with implementing much of the refugee ban, clarified that customs and border agents should allow legal residents to enter the country. The Pentagon was trying to exempt Iraqis who worked alongside the U.S. and coalition forces from the 90-day ban on entry from the predominantly Muslim countries.
 
"There are a number of people in Iraq who have worked for us in a partnership role, whether fighting alongside us or working as translators, often doing so at great peril to themselves," said Navy Capt. Jeff Davis, a Pentagon spokesman.
 
Policies with such broad reach are typically vetted by affected agencies and subject to review by multiple agencies. It's a process that can be frustratingly slow but is aimed at avoiding unintended consequences.
 
On Capitol Hill, lawmakers in Trump's party sought to distance themselves from the wide-ranging order.
 
While Spicer said "appropriate committees and leadership offices" on Capitol Hill were consulted, GOP lawmakers said their offices had no hand in drafting the order and no briefings from the White House on how it would work.
 
"I think they know that it could have been done in a better way," Corker said of the White House.
 
Some Trump supporters defended the president, saying his actions should not have come as a surprise given his positions during the campaign.
 
"Nothing he did over the weekend was new," said Newt Gingrich, the former House speaker and an informal adviser. He conceded that coordination could have been better, but he said Trump's vow to quickly bring change to Washington will sometimes mean he needs to prioritize fast action over broad consultation.
 
"If you're the reformer, you need the momentum," Gingrich said.
 
___
 
AP writers Matthew Lee, Lolita C. Baldor, Erica Werner, Jonathan Lemire and Vivian Salama contributed to this report.