'Fun center' files for bankruptcy after lawsuits over broken bones, twisted limbs

Updated:

Loading

SEATTLE - Nearly three years after KIRO 7 first uncovered multiple serious injuries suffered at a Bellevue trampoline center, the company has filed for bankruptcy. 

 

Sky High Sports in Bellevue filed for bankruptcy protection on Jan. 13, according to this document filed with the U.S. Bankruptcy Court in Nevada.

 

KIRO 7 Eyewitness News reporter Amy Clancy uncovered a number of injuries at the center -- and lawsuits against the company -- in two reports in 2010.

 

Through public disclosure requests, the KIRO 7 Investigations revealed that emergency responders had been called to Sky High Sports on 120th Avenue Northeast at least 20 times in the first six months the business was open.

 

Multiple lawsuits, claiming negligence, have been filed -- including one on behalf of Tom Rayfield's then-15-year old son, who suffered a severely broken ankle while jumping at Sky High in 2009.

 

"He was hurt really bad, and as a result, I would like that nobody would have to go through what he has gone through," Rayfield said.

 

Pictures and xrays revealed in the 2010 reports showed injuries suffered at the center.  A lawsuit was filed, claiming Sky High and its operators were "grossly negligent."

 

Attorney Sim Osborn has filed lawsuits against Sky High on behalf of 21 clients. He said he believes Sky High filed Chapter 11 because of the many potentially costly claims of negligence.

 

"They made the conscious choice to create a very attractive place for children that is very dangerous, and now there are consequences to that," Osborn said. "And they are being held responsible for their decisions."

 

In a statement, the attorney representing Sky High Sports in its bankruptcy case noted that it's a Chapter 11 reorganization, rather than a liquidation.

 

"Sky High Sports Seattle remains open for business and will continue to remain open during and after the Chapter 11 process," said Kevin A. Darby. "Chapter 11 allows a business, such as Sky High, to formally restructure its financial affairs and insurance requirements while continuing to conduct business as usual."