Former youth baseball coach sentenced for child porn

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SEATTLE - A family law attorney who previously practiced in Kent was sentenced Monday to 25 years in prison and lifetime supervised release for production of child pornography/sexual exploitation of children, receipt of child pornography and one count of possession of child pornography.

U.S. Attorney Jenny A. Durkan said 50-year-old David Engle of Maple Valley was arrested in November 2012. 

Engle, who both volunteered and ran a business involving youth baseball, has been jailed since his arrest.

According to records filed in the case, Engle came to the attention of law enforcement following the investigation of an international movie production company that operated a website offering DVDs and streaming videos for sale.   Records said the videos showed young boys engaged in sexual activity.

Prosecutors said between 2005 and 2011, Engle purchased 184 different items from the website. 

After authorities executed a search warrant at Engle’s home and storage locker in November 2012, they discovered more than 500 videos of Engle sexually molesting a young boy under the age of 16, Durkan said.  Officials said they later discovered more evidence of Engle sexually molesting another boy, also under the age of 16.

Engle is being separately prosecuted for those offenses by the King County Prosecutor’s Office. 

Following forensic examination of computers, DVDs, thumb drives and floppy disks, investigators determined that Engle possessed tens of thousands of images of child pornography and thousands of videos of child pornography, authorities said.

In asking for a 30 year prison sentence, prosecutors noted that Engle betrayed the trust put in him by the community. 

“To then learn that defendant had been charged with producing child pornography and molesting children added additional layers of anguish that can never be ameliorated.  To the mothers of minor victim 1 and minor victim 2, to all of the parents who put their trust in the defendant, to all of the children who called him “coach,” to all of those involved in Little League baseball for the pure enjoyment of the sport, and to the larger community, the defendant’s criminal conduct is especially monstrous,” prosecutors wrote in their sentencing memo.