Defense: Immanuel getting treats to lie about Williams abuse

by: Lee Stoll Updated:

Day 12 in the Skagit abuse and murder case as the Williams defense team tried to prove an abused boy is being trained to lie about his adopted parents.

Skagit County, Wash. - Day 12 in the Skagit abuse and murder case as the Williams defense team tried to prove an abused boy is being trained to lie about his adopted parents.
Witnesses have testified Immanuel Williams was tortured and suffers PTSD. But attorneys for Larry and Carri Williams say he's lying about what happened because that's what police want to hear.

"You have more and more allegations against the Williams, isn't that right?" Asked Larry Williams' attorney Rachel Forde.

"I had a lot to talk about with the counselor," said Immanuel, who is deaf.

Attorneys for the Williams tried to prove Immanuel is having fun in court — playing video games during breaks and getting treats like hamburgers when he tells investigators terrible things about the couple.

"You're no longer one of dozens of kids in an orphanage, right?" Said Forde.

"I don't think so, I'm not," said Immanuel.

Immanuel and a girl named Hana were adopted from Ethiopia by Larry, a Boeing worker, and Carri, a stay-at-home mom.
Immanuel says the conservative Christian couple beat the adopted kids, locked them in closets and fed them frozen food — which is very different from how the Williams' own 7-children say they were treated.
Hana froze and starved to death at the family's gated Sedro-Woolley home 2 years ago.

"Everyone is treating you special, aren't they?" Said Forde.

"I think so," said Immanuel, through an interpreter.

Forde accused the boy's counselors and interpreters of putting words in his mind — something Immanuel denied.

"Just like after you saw the sign assault signed, you copied it and started using it yourself, right?" Said Forde.

"No I already knew because I had seen it in action myself," said Immanuel.

The couple could face life in prison if convicted of homicide by abuse, manslaughter and assault.

"No matter what you say in court there won't be any consequences for you, right?" said Forde.

"Yes, that's correct," said Immanuel.