City considers public input before using surveillance cameras

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SEATTLE —

Many residents are worried that surveillance cameras installed in Seattle neighborhoods are invading their privacy, but many got a chance to give their input to the city.

 

Police said the cameras will provide extra security for the port, and they will help police, fire and the Coast Guard respond to emergencies.

 

Cameras have already been installed on Alki Avenue and 61st Street.

 

The cameras will be on 24 hours a day, rotate 360 degrees, zoom and pan.

 

The plan is to put up 30 cameras along the waterfront from Fauntleroy to Golden Gardens.

 

After the outrage from people who live in the neighborhoods, police said the cameras will not be turned on until the city council holds public hearings about them.  Rules will have to be put in place and how the cameras will be used.

 

The American Civil Liberties Union wrote a letter to the Seattle Police Department about the cameras, and they question how long police will keep the video.

 

A meeting about the cameras was held during a Wednesday afternoon City Council meeting that was open to the public.